DiceKeys

DiceKeys reminds me a lot of Diceware. The user gets a set of special dice, in this case, which they roll into a box.

DiceKeys
DiceKeys

The user then closes the box, preserving their DiceKeys pattern indefinitely. The result of the dice roll is then used to seed a hash algorithm that, in turn, generates application-specific passwords and even U2F tokens.

DiceKeys
DiceKeys

DiceKeys also comes with an app that can assemble the master password automatically by scanning the dice (including their orientation, which the app uses to generate further entropy), and the QR code-like symbols on the top and bottom of the dice.

DiceKeys are backup security keys with 196 bits of security made of 25 custom dice and a rugged holder, built to last a lifetime. . . . As password managers add support for DiceKeys, you’ll also be able to use your DiceKey in place of a `master’ password. . . .

Use the open source DiceKeys app to quickly read your DiceKey from a device. Our API allows apps and services to derive their own private secrets from your DiceKey without those apps seeing the key itself.

Our reference implementation runs in most modern web browsers, allowing it to work on an incredibly diverse range of devices. While built with web-based technologies (TypeScript & WebAssembly), it runs entirely locally on your device.

We are also developing Android and iOS versions to provide a richer experience on those devices.

The cost for a set of DiceKeys looks to run about US$25.

DOTS RPG 3D Printed Braille Dice for RPGs

The DOTS RPG Project is dedicated to making accessible role-playing game accessories for visually impaired users.

Their website hosts free Creative Commons-licensed 3D models for a variety of braille RPG dice, or customers can order 3D printed ones from the DOTS RPG Shapeways store.

DOTS RPG Polyhedral Set
DOTS RPG Polyhedral Set
DOTS RPG Lightning Set
DOTS RPG Lightning Set
DOTS RPG Fate D6
DOTS RPG Fate D6

Medieval-Era Loaded Dice from Norway

The dice below were found in Bergen (Bjørgvin), and are believed to have originated from the medieval era. What sets these apart, as can be seen in the image below, is that two of the die’s faces show the number five. The die also features two sides with the number four.

So either they were intended for a game that didn’t use a 1 or 2, or somebody was trying to pull a fast one in a game of chance.

Medieval Loaded Dice
Medieval Loaded Dice