Microsoft Announces Plans to Add DNS Over HTTPS to Windows

Nice to see Microsoft join the DNS Over HTTPS crowd.

Here in Windows Core Networking, we’re interested in keeping your traffic as private as possible, as well as fast and reliable. While there are many ways we can and do approach user privacy on the wire, today we’d like to talk about encrypted DNS. Why? Basically, because supporting encrypted DNS queries in Windows will close one of the last remaining plain-text domain name transmissions in common web traffic.

Providing encrypted DNS support without breaking existing Windows device admin configuration won’t be easy. However, at Microsoft we believe that “we have to treat privacy as a human right. We have to have end-to-end cybersecurity built into technology.”

We also believe Windows adoption of encrypted DNS will help make the overall Internet ecosystem healthier. There is an assumption by many that DNS encryption requires DNS centralization. This is only true if encrypted DNS adoption isn’t universal. To keep the DNS decentralized, it will be important for client operating systems (such as Windows) and Internet service providers alike to widely adopt encrypted DNS.

CloudFlare’s Encrypted DNS App for Android and iOS

CloudFlare recently released an app for Android and iOS that makes it easy for users to encrypt their DNS queries using CloudFlare’s 1.1.1.1 DNS resolver.

For once, I’m really not sure what the point is of a security tool like this. One of the criteria for using the 1.1.1.1 app is you need to turn off any VPN you have activated. But I’m not really certain what the use case would be for wanting encrypted DNS but not a VPN.

Personally, I use ProtonMail’s VPN on my phone when I want privacy from the local network operator. There are issues with Proton, but it’s security is more than good enough for anyone not concerned about state actors in their threat model.

Mozilla’s Cartoon Intro to DNS over HTTPS

Mozilla’s Lin Clark has a cartoon guide to DNS over HTTPS that . . . well . . . bottom line, there is no way to talk about DNS over HTTPS without getting fairly technical (one of the subheads on Lin’s lengthy pice is “What isn’t fixed by TRR with DoH?”) but this is probably as close as anyone is going to get.

A cartoon intro to DNS over HTTPS
A cartoon intro to DNS over HTTPS