Famine persists in Sudan

So world food prices are headed
down; then what is going on in Sudan? An Associated Press report says
over 350,000 Sudanese need immediate food relieve or they run the risk
of starvation. By August 1999 that number is expected to rise to 1.6 million.

Sudan has some of the best land
in the world for agriculture, so what’s the problem? An ongoing civil
war that has persisted in one form or another for almost 40 years. Northern
Sudan, which is primarily Arab and Muslim, is run by an Arab strongman.
Southern Sudan, which is predominantly Christian and animist, has been
fighting to gain its independence. Human rights violations have been common
on both sides.

In October 1996, one of the rebels,
Kerubino Kwanying Bol, switched sides and attacked the southern Bahr el
Ghazal. Kerubino subsequently switched sides again, back to the rebels,
and attacked government-held towns of Wau, Awiel and Gogrial.

The resulting devastation has led
farmers to abandon their crop land en masse as well as cut off supply
routes. As a result, Sudan is on the verge of yet another man-made famine.

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