The Citrix Hack and Password Spraying

Somebody made off with terabytes of data from Citrix, and one of the interesting tidbits from Citrix’s press release about the breach is speculation that the hackers used “password spraying,”

While not confirmed, the FBI has advised that the hackers likely used a tactic known as password spraying, a technique that exploits weak passwords. Once they gained a foothold with limited access, they worked to circumvent additional layers of security.

The Secret Security Wiki provides additional information about how password spraying attacks work,

Traditional brute-force attacks attempt to gain unauthorized access to a single account by guessing the password. This can quickly result in the targeted account getting locked-out, as commonly used account-lockout policies allow for a limited number of failed attempts (typically three to five) during a set period of time. During a password-spray attack (also known as the “low-and-slow” method), the malicious actor attempts a single commonly used password (such as ‘Password1’ or ‘Summer2017’) against many accounts before moving on to attempt a second password, and so on. This technique allows the actor to remain undetected by avoiding rapid or frequent account lockouts.

Clever. With access to enough account usernames, somebody somewhere in an organization is likely to have practiced poor password hygiene.

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