80% of Android Apps Use TLS to Encrypt Traffic

Back in 2018, Google announced that beginning with Android 9, it would prevent apps from using unencrypted connections by default. As of December 2019, Google notes that 80 percent of all apps in the Google Play store use TLS, and that rises to 90 percent of all apps targeting Android 9 and higher.

Android 7 (API level 24) introduced the Network Security Configuration in 2016, allowing app developers to configure the network security policy for their app through a declarative configuration file. To ensure apps are safe, apps targeting Android 9 (API level 28) or higher automatically have a policy set by default that prevents unencrypted traffic for every domain.

Today, we’re happy to announce that 80% of Android apps are encrypting traffic by default. The percentage is even greater for apps targeting Android 9 and higher, with 90% of them encrypting traffic by default.

Since November 1 2019, all app (updates as well as all new apps on Google Play) must target at least Android 9. As a result, we expect these numbers to continue improving. Network traffic from these apps is secure by default and any use of unencrypted connections is the result of an explicit choice by the developer.

That last sentence is a bit concerning. If app developers want to explicitly make their apps communicate through unencrypted connections, that’s fine, but as far as I can tell there is no way that consumers are made aware of this.

Just as modern browsers warn me that the website I’m visiting doesn’t use encryption, Google should inform users when they are using apps that do so as well. I’d be happy with a notification on the Google Play store page for such apps that “This app sends network traffic over unencrypted channels” or something like that.

(Yes, users could set up a packet analysis tool to look at the data their phone is sending, but they shouldn’t have to do so).

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