British Researcher Denied License to Clone Horses

British Professor Twink Allen accused the British government of caving to pressure from animal rights activists in denying his application for a license to clone horses. Dr. Allen wanted to clone horses, in part, to improve genetic selection of competition horses.

According to the BBC, The Home Office, which approves animal research in Great Britain, turned down Allen’s request after concluding that the possible benefits did not outweigh the possible harms to the animals involved.

Allen told the Daily Mail that British politicians were afraid of animal rights activists and chose the easy way out,

It is wimpishness on the part of politicians. They are frightened there might be some protests and they don’t want to even face that. It’s blatant Government suppression of innovative science for political expedience.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Animals backed the government’s decision. The RSPCA’s Natasha Lane told the BBC (emphasis added),

Cloning horses or any animal for competition purposes is completely unacceptable. It’s a trivial purpose and cloning causes pain and suffering to animals because the vast number of embryos die, and those that don’t die may develop abnormalities and die young.

Lane’s line about the death of cloned embryos is a bit odd — does she consider horse embryos to be moral patients?

Not to worry though, this research — like others — will simply move to other countries. Italian scientists cloned the first horse in August 2003.

Allen plans to appeal the rejection of his license application.

Source:

Expert fights horse cloning ban. Christine McGourty, BBC, May 5, 2004.

Horse-cloning scientist hits out at ‘Home Office wimps’. Robin Yapp, Daily Mail (London), May 6, 2004.

S. 2352 American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2004


American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2004 (Introduced in Senate)

S 2352 IS

108th CONGRESS

2d Session

S. 2352

To prevent the slaughter of horses in and from the United States for human consumption by prohibiting the slaughter of horses for human consumption and by prohibiting the trade and transport of horseflesh and live horses intended for human consumption, and for other purposes.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

April 27, 2004

Mr. ENSIGN (for himself, Ms. LANDRIEU, Mr. LIEBERMAN, Mr. INOUYE, and Ms. COLLINS) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry


A BILL

To prevent the slaughter of horses in and from the United States for human consumption by prohibiting the slaughter of horses for human consumption and by prohibiting the trade and transport of horseflesh and live horses intended for human consumption, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the `American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act of 2004′.

SEC. 2. PURPOSES.

    The purposes of this Act are–

      (1) to prohibit the slaughter of horses for human consumption;
      (2) to prohibit the sale, possession, and trade of horseflesh for human consumption; and
      (3) to prohibit the sale, possession, and trade of live horses for slaughter for human consumption.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:
      (1) EUTHANASIA- The term `euthanasia’ means to kill an animal humanely by means that immediately render the animal unconscious, with this state remaining until the swift death of the animal.

      (2) EXPORT- The term `export’ means to take from any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to a place not subject to that jurisdiction, whether or not the taking constitutes an exportation within the meaning of the customs laws of the United States.
      (3) HORSE- The term `horse’ means all members of the equid family, including horses, ponies, donkeys, mules, asses, and burros.
      (4) HORSEFLESH- The term `horseflesh’ means the flesh of a dead horse, including the viscera, skin, hair, hide, hooves, and bones of the horse.
      (5) HUMAN CONSUMPTION- The term `human consumption’ means ingestion by people as a source of food.
      (6) IMPORT- The term `import’ means to bring into any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States from a place not subject to that jurisdiction, whether or not the bringing constitutes an importation within the meaning of the customs laws of the United States.
      (7) PERSON- The term `person’ means–

        (A) an individual, corporation, partnership, trust, association, or other private entity;
        (B) an officer, employee, agent, department, or instrumentality of–
          (i) the Federal Government; or
          (ii) any State, municipality, or political subdivision of a State; or
        (C) any other entity subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.
      (8) SECRETARY- The term `Secretary’ means the Secretary of Agriculture.

      (9) SLAUGHTER- The term `slaughter’ means the commercial slaughter of 1 or more horses with an intent to sell, barter, or trade horseflesh for human consumption.
      (10) STATE- The term `State’ means–
        (A) each of the several States of the United States;
        (B) the District of Columbia;
        (C) the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico;
        (D) Guam;

        (E) American Samoa;
        (F) the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands;
        (G) the Federated States of Micronesia;
        (H) the Republic of the Marshall Islands;
        (I) the Republic of Palau;
        (J) the United States Virgin Islands; and

        (K) any other territory or possession of the United States.
      (11) TRANSPORT- The term `transport’ means–
        (A) to move by any means; or
        (B) to receive or load onto a vehicle for the purpose of movement.
      (12) UNITED STATES- The term `United States’ means the customs territory of the United States, as defined in general note 2 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States.

SEC. 4. PROHIBITED ACTS.

    A person shall not–
      (1) slaughter a horse for human consumption;
      (2) import into, or export from, the United States–
        (A) horseflesh for human consumption; or
        (B) live horses intended for slaughter for human consumption;
      (3) sell or barter, offer to sell or barter, purchase, possess, transport, deliver, or receive–

        (A) horseflesh for human consumption; or
        (B) live horses intended for slaughter for human consumption; or
      (4) solicit, request, or otherwise knowingly cause any act prohibited under paragraph (1), (2), or (3).

SEC. 5. PENALTIES.

    (a) CRIMINAL PENALTIES- A person that violates section 4 shall be fined under title 18, United States Code, imprisoned for not more than 1 year, or both.

    (b) CIVIL PENALTIES-

      (1) IN GENERAL- In addition to any other civil or criminal penalty that may be imposed under title 18, United States Code, or any other provision of law, if a person violates section 4, the Secretary shall–
        (A) assess a civil penalty against the person of not less than $2,500 but not more than $5,000; and
        (B) confiscate all horses in the physical or legal possession of the person at the time of arrest, if the horses are intended for slaughter.
      (2) REMISSION OR MITIGATION OF PENALTIES- For good cause shown, the Secretary may remit or mitigate any civil penalty under this Act.
      (3) DEBARMENT- The Secretary shall prohibit a person from importing, exporting, transporting, trading, or selling horses in the United States, if the Secretary finds that the person has engaged in a pattern or practice of actions that have resulted in a final judicial or administrative determination with respect to the assessment of criminal or civil penalties for violations of this Act.

    (c) NOTICE; HEARING- No monetary penalty may be assessed against a person for a violation under this section unless the person is given notice and opportunity for a hearing with respect to the violation in accordance with section 554 of title 5, United States Code.

    (d) SEPARATE OFFENSES-
      (1) LIVE HORSE- Each live horse transported, traded, slaughtered, or possessed in violation of this Act shall constitute a separate offense.
      (2) HORSEFLESH- Each 400 hundred pounds or less of horseflesh transported, traded, slaughtered, or possessed in violation of this Act shall constitute a separate offense.

SEC. 6. ENFORCEMENT.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The Secretary shall enforce this Act directly or by agreement with any other Federal, State, or local agency.

    (b) ADMINISTRATION- Any person authorized by the Secretary to enforce this Act–

      (1) may execute any warrant or process issued by any officer or court of competent jurisdiction to enforce this Act; and
      (2) if so authorized, may, in addition to any other authority conferred by law–
        (A) with or without warrant or other process, arrest any person committing (in the presence or view of the authorized person) a violation of this Act (including a regulation promulgated under this Act);
        (B) seize the cargo of any truck or other conveyance used or employed to violate this Act (including a regulation promulgated under this Act) or that reasonably appears to have been so used or employed; and
        (C) seize, whenever and wherever found, all horses and horseflesh possessed in violation of this Act (including a regulation promulgated under this Act) and dispose of the horses and horseflesh, in accordance with this section (including regulations promulgated under this Act).

    (c) PLACEMENT OF CONFISCATED HORSES-

      (1) TEMPORARY PLACEMENT- After confiscation of a live horse pursuant to this Act, an arresting authority shall work with animal welfare societies and animal control departments–
        (A) to ensure the temporary placement of the horse with an animal rescue facility that is an organization described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and is exempt from taxation under section 501(a) of that Code, while the person charged with violating this Act is prosecuted; or
        (B) if placement at such a facility is not practicable, to temporarily place the horse with–
          (i) a facility that has as its primary purpose the humane treatment of animals; or
          (ii) another suitable location, as determined by the Secretary or arresting authority.
      (2) BONDS-

        (A) IN GENERAL- The owner of a horse confiscated under this Act may prevent permanent placement of the horse by the facility that has temporary custody of the horse by posting a bond with a court of competent jurisdiction in an amount the court determines is sufficient to provide for the necessary care and keeping of the horse for at least 60 days, including the day on which the horse was taken into custody.
        (B) TIMING- The bond shall be filed with the court not later than 10 days after the horse is confiscated.
        (C) LACK OF BOND- If a bond is not posted in accordance with this paragraph, the custodial facility shall determine permanent placement of the horse in accordance with reasonable practices for the humane treatment of animals.
        (D) TREATMENT FOLLOWING BOND PERIOD-
          (i) NEW BOND- If the animal has not yet been returned to the owner at the end of the time for which expenses are covered by the bond and if the owner desires to prevent permanent placement of the animal by the custodial facility, the owner shall post a new bond with the court within 10 days after expiration of the prior bond.
          (ii) PERMANENT PLACEMENT- If a new bond is not posted in accordance with clause (i), the custodial facility shall determine permanent placement of the horse in accordance with reasonable practices for the humane treatment of animals.

        (E) COSTS FOR PROVIDING CARE FOR HORSE DEDUCTED FROM BOND- If a bond is posted in accordance with this paragraph, the custodial facility may draw from the bond the actual reasonable costs incurred by the facility in providing the necessary care and keeping of the confiscated horse from the date of the initial confiscation of the horse to the date of final

disposition of the horse in the criminal action charging a violation of this Act.

      (3) PERMANENT PLACEMENT- Except as provided in subsection (d), any horse confiscated pursuant to this Act and not returned to the owner after confiscation shall be placed permanently with an animal rescue facility or other suitable facility as described in this section on–
        (A) the conviction under this Act of the owner of the horse;
        (B) the surrender of the horse by the owner;
        (C) the failure of the owner of the horse to post a bond as required in accordance with paragraph (2); or
        (D) the inability of the Secretary to identify the owner.

    (d) EUTHANASIA OF HORSES-
      (1) EMERGENCY CIRCUMSTANCES- The Secretary or any law enforcement authority charged with enforcing this Act may order or perform the immediate euthanasia of any horse in the field if the horse is injured beyond recovery and suffering irreversibly.
      (2) HORSES BEYOND RECOVERY AND UNPLACEABLE- The Secretary or any law enforcement authority charged with enforcing this Act may order a licensed veterinarian to euthanize any confiscated horse if–
        (A) the confiscated horse is injured, disabled, or diseased beyond recovery; or
        (B) placement at an animal rescue facility or other suitable facility, as described in this section, is not practicable within 90 days of any circumstance described in subsection (c)(3).
      (3) METHOD- In euthanizing a horse under paragraph (2), the Secretary, law enforcement authority charged with enforcing this Act, or a licensed veterinarian conducting the euthanasia shall use a method of euthanasia rated `Acceptable’ for horses in the most recent Report of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Panel on Euthanasia.

    (e) FUNDING OF ANIMAL RESCUE FACILITIES-
      (1) GRANTS- Subject to the availability of appropriated funds, the Secretary shall make grants to animal rescue facilities described in subsection (c)(1)(A) that have given adequate assurances to the Secretary that the facilities are willing to accept horses under this Act.
      (2) PENALTIES, FINES, AND FORFEITED PROPERTY- Amounts received as penalties or fines under this Act, and property forfeited under this Act, shall be used for the care of any live horses seized from violators of this Act and taken into the possession by the United States or placed with an animal rescue facility or other suitable location.

SEC. 7. REPORTS.

    Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, and on an annual basis thereafter, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on–
      (1) actions taken by the Secretary and other Federal agencies to carry out this Act; and

      (2) the adequacy of resources to carry out this Act.

SEC. 8. EXEMPTIONS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Subject to section 4 and subsection (b), nothing in this Act affects the regulation of horses by a State.

    (b) LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITIES-
      (1) IN GENERAL- A State or local law enforcement or arresting authority may take such actions as are necessary under section 6 to enforce this Act.
      (2) ENFORCEMENT- A person described in section 3(7)(B) may engage in activities described in paragraphs (2), (3), and (4) of section 4 solely for the purposes of enforcing this Act.

SEC. 9. REGULATIONS.

    The Secretary shall promulgate such regulations as are necessary to carry out this Act.

SEC. 10. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    This Act takes effect on the date that is 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act.

H.R. 857 – The American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act

HR 857 IH

108th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 857

To prevent the slaughter of horses in and from the United States for human consumption by prohibiting the slaughter of horses for human consumption and by prohibiting the trade and transport of horseflesh and live horses intended for human consumption, and for other purposes.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

February 13, 2003

Mr. SWEENEY (for himself, Mr. SPRATT, Mr. SHAYS, Mr. FORD, Mr. SMITH of New Jersey, Mr. MORAN of Virginia, Mr. COSTELLO, Mr. ISAKSON, Mr. VITTER, Mr. CALVERT, Mr. GALLEGLY, and Mr. GREENWOOD) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture, and in addition to the Committees on International Relations and Ways and Means, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILL

To prevent the slaughter of horses in and from the United States for human consumption by prohibiting the slaughter of horses for human consumption and by prohibiting the trade and transport of horseflesh and live horses intended for human consumption, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as `The American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act’.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

    Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Horses have played a significant role in the history and culture of the United States.
      (2) Horses in the United States are not raised for food or fiber.
      (3) As a non-food and recreational animal, horses should be protected from slaughter.
      (4) The foreign-owned horse slaughter industry has slaughtered and exported for human consumption over 3 million American horses in the last 2 decades.
      (5) Approximately 55,000 American horses are slaughtered for human consumption annually in the United States by foreign-owned slaughterhouses. Tens of thousands of live horses are exported from the United States annually for slaughter.
      (6) Horses slaughtered in these foreign-owned plants in the United States have often been hauled several thousand miles over several days, contrary to acceptable non-slaughter standards for water, food, and rest.

      (7) Many horses shipped to slaughter are young, healthy animals. Others are old, sick, blind, crippled and in otherwise poor condition and are unfit to withstand the rigors of long travel. Horses sent to be slaughtered are often shipped on crowded double deck trucks designed for shorter necked species such as pigs, cattle and sheep, and are forced to travel in a bent position which can result in suffering, injury and death.
      (8) Killing of horses by foreign-owned slaughterhouses in the United States contrasts with the preferable method of killing by chemical euthanasia.
      (9) Horses endure repeated blows to the head with stunning equipment that often does not render the animals unconscious. Some horses proceed still conscious through the remaining stages of slaughter being bled out and dismembered.
      (10) Because horses in America are not food animals, veterinarians commonly prescribe and treat horses with potent drugs that may reside in the horseflesh and be dangerous when consumed by humans.
      (11) Because of the lack of disclosure on the part of the agents and dealers for the slaughter plants people’s horses are many times acquired and slaughtered through fraud and misrepresentation. Slaughter also provides a quick and evidence-free outlet for stolen horses.
      (12) The imposition of a ban on the sale of horseflesh for human consumption, regardless of its source, is consistent with the international obligations of the United States because it applies equally to domestic and foreign producers and avoids any discrimination among foreign sources of competing products. Such a ban is also consistent with provisions of international agreements to which the United States is a party that expressly allow for measures designed to protect the health and welfare of animals and to enjoin the use of deceptive trade practices in international or domestic commerce.

SEC. 3. PURPOSE.

    The purpose of this Act is —
      (1) to prohibit the slaughter of horses for human consumption;
      (2) to prohibit the sale, possession, and trade of horseflesh for human consumption;
      (3) to prohibit the sale, possession, and trade of live horses for slaughter for human consumption.

SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

    For the purposes of this Act, the following definitions apply:

      (1) EUTHANASIA- The term `euthanasia’ means to kill an animal humanely by means that immediately renders the animal unconscious, with this state remaining until the animal’s swift death.
      (2) EXPORT- The term `export’ means to take from any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to a place not subject to such jurisdiction, whether or not the taking constitutes an exportation within the meaning of the customs laws of the United States.
      (3) HORSE- The term `horse’ means all members of the equid family, including horses, ponies, donkeys, mules, asses, and burros.
      (4) HORSEFLESH- The term `horseflesh’ means the flesh of a dead horse, including the animal’s viscera, skin, hair, hide, hooves, and bones.
      (5) HUMAN CONSUMPTION- The term `human consumption’ means ingestion by people as a source of food.
      (6) IMPORT- The term `import’ means to bring into any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States from a place not subject to such jurisdiction, whether or not the bringing constitutes an importation within the meaning of the customs laws of the United States.

      (7) PERSON- The term `person’ means–
        (A) an individual, corporation, partnership, trust, association, or other private entity;
        (B) an officer, employee, agent, department, or instrumentality of–
          (i) the Federal Government; or
          (ii) any State, municipality, or political subdivision of State; or
        (C) any other entity subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

      (8) SECRETARY- The term `Secretary’ means the Secretary of Agriculture.
      (9) SLAUGHTER- The term `slaughter’ means the commercial slaughter of one or more horses with the intent to sell, barter, or trade the flesh for human consumption.
      (10) STATE- The term `State’ means the several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, and any other territory, or possession of the United States.
      (11) TRANSPORT- The term `transport’ means to move by any means, or to receive or load onto a vehicle for the purpose of movement.
      (12) UNITED STATES- The term `United States’ means the customs territory of the United States, as defined in general note 2 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States.

SEC. 5. PROHIBITED ACTS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- A person shall not–
      (1) slaughter a horse for human consumption;
      (2) import into, or export from, the United States horseflesh for human consumption or live horses intended for slaughter for human consumption;
      (3) sell or barter, offer to sell or barter, purchase, possess, transport, deliver, or receive horseflesh for human consumption or live horses intended for slaughter for human consumption; or
      (4) solicit, request, or otherwise knowingly cause any act prohibited under paragraph (1), (2), or (3).

SEC. 6. PENALTIES AND ENFORCEMENT.

    (a) CRIMINAL PENALTIES- A person who violates section 5 shall be fined under title 18, United States Code, imprisoned for not more than 1 year, or both.

    (b) CIVIL PENALTIES-
      (1) IN GENERAL- Any person who violates any provision of section 5 shall, in addition to any other civil or criminal penalty that may be imposed under title 18, United States Code, or any other provision of law, be assessed, by the Secretary, a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 but not less than $2,500, and shall have confiscated all horses in that person’s physical or legal possession at the time of arrest, if said horses are intended for slaughter.
      (2) DEBARMENT- The Secretary shall prohibit a person from importing, exporting, transporting, trading, or selling horses in the United States, if the Secretary finds that the person has engaged in a pattern or practice of actions that has resulted in a final judicial or administrative determination with respect to the assessment of criminal or civil penalties for violations of any provision of this Act

    (c) NOTICE; HEARING- No monetary penalty may be assessed under this subsection against a person unless the person is given notice and opportunity for a hearing with respect to such violation in accordance with section 554 of title 5, United States Code.

    (d) ENFORCEMENT-

      (1) USE OF PERSONNEL- The Secretary shall enforce this Act, and may use, by agreement, the personnel, services, and facilities of any other Federal, State, or local agency for the purposes of enforcing this Act. For good cause shown, the Secretary may remit or mitigate any civil penalty.
      (2) EXECUTION OF PROCESS; ARREST; SEARCH; SEIZURE- Any person authorized by the Secretary to enforce this Act may execute any warrant or process issued by any officer or court of competent jurisdiction to enforce this Act. Such a person so authorized may, in addition to any other authority conferred by law–
        (A) with or without warrant or other process, arrest any person committing in his presence or view a violation of this Act or the regulations issued thereunder;
        (B) seize the cargo of any truck or other conveyance used or employed to violate this Act or the regulations issued hereunder or which reasonably appears to have been so used or employed; and
        (C) seize, whenever and wherever found, all horses and horseflesh possessed in violation of this Act or the regulations issued thereunder and dispose of them, in accordance with this section and regulations prescribed by the Secretary.
      (3) PLACEMENT OF CONFISCATED HORSES-

        (A) TEMPORARY PLACEMENT- After confiscation of a live horse pursuant to this Act, the arresting authorities shall work with animal welfare societies and animal control departments to ensure the temporary placement of the horse with an animal rescue facility that is an organization described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and is exempt from taxation under section 501(a) of such Code, while the person charged with violating this Act is prosecuted. If placement at such a facility is not possible, the arresting authorities shall work with animal welfare societies and animal control departments to temporarily place the horse with a facility that has as its primary purpose the humane treatment of animals, or another suitable location.
        (B) BONDS-
          (i) POSTING OF BOND- The owner of a horse confiscated pursuant to this Act may prevent permanent placement of the horse by the facility that has temporary custody of the horse by posting a bond with the court in an amount the court determines is sufficient to provide for the necessary care and keeping of the horse for at least 60 days, including the day on which the horse was taken into custody. Such bond shall be filed with the court within 10 days after the horse is confiscated. If a bond is not so posted, the custodial facility shall determine permanent placement of the horse in accordance with reasonable practices for the humane treatment of animals. If the animal has not yet been returned to the owner at the end of the time for which expenses are covered by the bond, and if the owner desires to prevent permanent placement of the animal by the custodial facility, the owner shall post a new bond with the court within ten days following the prior bond’s expiration. If a new bond is not so posted, the custodial facility shall determine permanent placement of the horse in accordance with reasonable practices for the humane treatment of animals.
          (ii) COSTS FOR PROVIDING CARE FOR HORSE DEDUCTED FROM BOND- If a bond has been posted in accordance with clause (i), the custodial facility may draw from the bond the actual reasonable costs incurred by the facility in providing the necessary care and keeping of the confiscated horse from the date of the initial confiscation to the date of final disposition of the horse in the criminal action charging a violation of this Act.
        (C) PERMANENT PLACEMENT- Any horse confiscated pursuant to this Act and not returned to the owner thereafter (except where otherwise provided in paragraph (4)) shall be placed permanently with an animal rescue facility or other suitable facility as described in this section upon–
          (i) the conviction of the horse’s owner pursuant to this Act;

          (ii) the owner’s surrender of the horse;
          (iii) the failure of the horse’s owner to post a bond as required in accordance with subparagraph (B); or
          (iv) the Secretary’s inability to identify the owner.
      (4) EUTHANASIA OF HORSES-
        (A) EMERGENCY CIRCUMSTANCES- The Secretary or any law enforcement individual charged with enforcing this Act may order or perform the immediate euthanasia of any horse in the field when such horse is injured beyond recovery and suffering irreversibly. Methods used shall be in accordance with the most recent Report of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Panel on Euthanasia (2000) and State and local laws and may include gunshot, but shall not include electrocution or penetrating captive bolt.
        (B) HORSES BEYOND RECOVERY AND UNPLACEABLE- The Secretary or any individual charged with enforcing this Act may order the euthanasia of any confiscated horse when injured, disabled, or diseased beyond recovery or when placement at an animal rescue facility or other suitable facility, as described in this section, is not possible within 90 days of any circumstance as described in section 6(d)(3)(C). An equine or large-animal veterinarian shall perform the euthanasia rated `Acceptable’ for horses in the most recent Report of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Panel on Euthanasia (2000), but shall not include penetrating captive bolt, electrocution, gunshot, or other non-chemical means.

    (e) FUNDING OF ANIMAL RESCUE FACILITIES-
      (1) GRANTS- To the extent that funds are made available for this purpose by Acts of appropriation, the Secretary shall make grants to animal rescue facilities described in this section that have given adequate assurances to the Secretary that they are willing to accept horses confiscated pursuant to this Act.
      (2) PENALTIES, FINES, AND FORFEITED PROPERTY- Amounts received as penalties, fines, or forfeited property under this Act shall be used for the care of any live horses seized from violators of this Act and taken into the possession of the United States or placed with an animal rescue facility as described in this section.

    (f) CALCULATION OF VIOLATIONS- For purposes of this section, a separate offense shall be calculated as follows:
      (1) Each live horse transported, traded, slaughtered, or possessed in violation of this Act shall constitute a separate offense.
      (2) Every four hundred pounds or less of confiscated horseflesh shall constitute a separate offense.

SEC. 7. REPORT ON ENFORCEMENT EFFORTS.

    Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, and on an annual basis thereafter, the Secretary shall submit a report to Congress on the efforts of the United States Government to enforce the provisions of this Act and the adequacy of the resources to do so.

SEC. 8. EXEMPTIONS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Except as provided in section 5, nothing in this Act shall be construed to affect the regulation by any State of its horse population.

    (b) EXCEPTION FOR DESIGNATED LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIAL PURPOSES- A person described in section 4(7)(B) may engage in activities described in paragraphs (2), (3), and (4) of section 5 solely for purposes of enforcing this Act.

SEC. 9. DATE OF ENFORCEMENT.

    This Act shall take effect one year after the date of the enactment of this Act.

Senators Ensign and Landrieu Introduce Horse Slaughter Ban in Senate

U.S. Senators John Ensign (R-NV) and Mary Landrieu (D-LA) in April introduce a bill that would ban the slaughter of horses for human consumption in the United States.

The bill, S. 2352, is almost identical to a House version of the legislation, H.R. 857, which has almost 200 cosponsors according to the National Horse Protection Council.

In a press release, the National Horse Protection Council quoted Sen. Ensign as saying,

A series of recent polls show that Americans overwhelmingly support a ban on the slaughter of horses for human consumption. This should come as no surprise because horses in the United States are not raised for food. Despite state laws barring this barbaric practice, the slaughter of horses for human consumption continues because of an absence of a strong federal law to prohibit it. The time for such a law is now.

Similarly, Sen. Landrieu is quoted as saying,

Horses hold a special place in American history and culture, be it through farm work racing, trail riding, companionship or a host of other activities. Americans don’t consume horsemeat, so most are shocked to find out this takes place at all. In fact, surveys from around the country showed that Americans overwhelmingly want this brutal practice to end.

Those are pretty lousy arguments in favor of banning horse slaughter. The claim that many Americans don’t approve of it is the lamest form of an appeal to authority.

The claim that it is barbaric is, of course, also leveled against all animal agriculture, but neither Landrieu nor Ensign seem willing to propose a ban on animal agriculture itself. If there are barbaric practices that are cruel in horse slaughter, the obvious legislation that would needed would be requirements that the USDA study the matter and issue regulations to ensure that horses are slaughtered humanely.

The full text of can be read HR 857 here and the full text of S. 2532 can be read here.

Source:

Senate version of American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act Introduced. Press Release, The National Horse Protection Coalition, April 28, 2004.

AAEP Clarifies Its Non-Position on Horse Slaughter Bill

In writing about a proposed ban on horse slaughter introduced into the U.S. Congress, this web site quoted from an American Veterinary Medical Association press release that said as follows,

According to the American Association of Equine Practitioners, subsistence care for these horses would cost approximately $1825/horse/year, resulting in a potential funding requirement of $100 million/year during the first year of HR 857Â’s enactment. Adding more horses ever year to the pool of those needing care means that these costs will only increase.

In January the AAEP clarified its position on the horse slaughter bill after it was accused of attempting to prevent or stall the bill’s passage by an anti-slaughter group.

Outgoing AAEP president Dr. Tom Lenz told veterinary magazine DVM that while his group was not “proactively opposing” the horse slaughter bill, his group didn’t necessarily have a very high opinion of it either,

Our approach is to educate the horse owner and the legislature and try to protect the health and welfare of the horse. . . . Honestly the people who propose these bills and support them don’t honestly understand the issue. They tend to look at this as an emotional issue – these are horses, our companions and we’re sending them off to slaughter.

In a prepared statement, the AAEP said of horse slaughter,

Our association believes slaughter is not the most desirable option for addressing the problem of unwanted horses. However, if a horse owner is not able or willing to provide humane care, the AAEP believes that euthanasia at a processing facility is a humane alternative to a life of suffering, inadequate care and possibly abandonment.

The AEEP has concerns about a number of the provisions of the proposed ban, and might be willing to support the bill if those concerns were addressed. For example, an obvious problem with the proposed ban is that it calls for unwanted animals to receive care, but leaves no provision for funding such care. According to DVM,

Specific to the bill, H.R. 857, referred to as the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, AAEP says it would consider supporting passage if specific revisions were made:

  • Funding of care for unwanted horses. As the bill stands, it does not address financial support for unwanted horses voluntarily given up by their owners. AAEP expresses concern that horse rescue and retirement groups will not have adequate resources without federal funding.

“The bill says the fed funds may be appropriated if horses are confiscated,” Lenz says. “But we don’t think that’s adequate-‘maybe.’ We definitely have to have some funds allocated to that.”

Lenz also told DVM that proponents of the bill are lying about the humaneness or cruelty of different methods of slaughter,

They’re making a judgment on what’s an acceptable humane form of euthanasia. I’ve been to the slaughter plant in Texas and it is extremely humane. Proponents of the bill are misleading people in describing the procedure. This is an issue that has to be based on scientific fact. Our goal is to be the voice of reason, because the proponents tend to push this on an emotional level.

The full text of the proposed ban on horse slaughter can be read here.

Source:

AAEP clarifies stance on horse slaughter. Stephanie Davis, DVM Newsmagazine, January 1, 2004.

American Veterinary Medical Association Opposes Horse Slaughter Bill

The American Veterinary Medical Association announced in January its opposition to the House Bill on Transportation and Processing of Horses for Slaughter.

That bill, introduced by Rep. John Sweeney (NY), would place limits on the transportation and killing of horses that would almost certainly drastically reduce the number of horses slaughtered in the United States. Currently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that as many as 55,000 horses are slaughtered annually in the United States.

The AVMA says it opposes the bill on the grounds that a number of its provisions will worsen, rather than improve, the treatment of horses. In a prepared statement announcing the groupÂ’s opposition to the bill, AVMA president Jack Walther said,

The welfare of animals, and in this case horses, is the primary concern of veterinarians. The proposed legislation, as written, could actually result in less humane treatment of these horses. . . . Humane slaughter may not be the most desirable option for addressing the problem of unwanted horses. However, it may be preferable to allowing these horses to face a life of inadequate care or possible abandonment.

The major problem the AVMA appears to have with the bill is that it doesnÂ’t adequately address dealing with unwanted horses who will no longer be able to be sent to slaughter. According to the AVMA,

HR 857 does not adequately address the welfare of horses for which humane slaughter will be removed as an option. The bill does not establish standards that horse rescue facilities must meet to ensure the humane care of these horses.

. . .

The number of unwanted horses presently sent for humane slaughter will be removed as an option. The bill does not establish standards that horse facilities must meet to ensure the humane care of these horses.

HR 857 estimates that approximately 55,000 horses were slaughtered in United States facilities last year. According to the American Association of Equine Practitioners, subsistence care for these horses would cost approximately $1825/horse/year, resulting in a potential funding requirement of $100 million/year during the first year of HR 857Â’s enactment. Adding more horses ever year to the pool of those needing care means that these costs will only increase.

The full text of the proposed bill can be read here.

Source:

AVMA Opposes Bill on Transportation & Processing of Horses for Slaughter. Press Release, American Veterinary Medical Association, January 7, 2004.