Leave-ing malnutrition behind

A group of scientists thinks it might have a solution to ending the endemic malnutrition problems of hundreds of millions of people — they need to eat their alfalfa. Extraordinarily rich in protein, alfalfa is also very cheap to grow. According to an Agence France-Presse report, alfalfa is full of beta-carotene, iron, magnesium, folic acids and other important nutrients. The alfalfa can be dried and shipped in a leaf-like form around the world.

Now that the drying and processing technique has been perfected, scientists are awaiting a large scale research project to see if alfalfa can be mass produced and processed in developing nations to alleviate malnutrition.

No Future for North Korea?

In an op-ed piece for Scripps Howard New Service, Amos A. Jordan and Jae H. Ku of the Center for Strategic & International Studies predict North Korea’s latest round of famine and economic disaster may bring down dictator Kim Jong Il. Jordan and Ku write,

Economic woes are so deep, starvation so prevalent and his [Kim Jong IL] policies to overcome the problem so disastrously inadequate that his ousting is increasingly probable.

According to Jordan and Ku, North Korea’s economy has declined for seven straight years and although adverse weather in 1995-7 partially accounts for the specifics of the current famine,

there is a persistent shortfall of up to two million tons of grain that is largely a result of structural inefficiencies, lack of incentives, and inadequacies of resource inputs.

Meanwhile John Yale of World Vision International is one of the few people from the West to get a first hand look at conditions in North Korea. In Associated Press report Yale described what he saw on a recent trip to North Korea,

We saw people scavenging for food in fields that had already been harvested, looking for left-over roots — children, older people, even men in uniform.

Australia hosts debate about food and preserving wildlife

In Sydney, Australia a few weeks ago the Hudson Institute’s Dennis Avery, the Australia Conservation Foundation’s Jim Downer and World Wildlife Fund/Australia’s Ray Nias debated the best policies to ensure that the world is able to feed a projected 9 to 12 billion people in 2050 while at the same time protecting wildlife. All three more or less agreed that a key to preserving wildlife will be increasing crops yields to avoid converting lots more land to agricultural purposes.

The three disagreed on the best route to achieve that, with Avery favoring free trade and high yield farming, Downer for organic cropping methods and integrated pest management, and Nias for land use planning and more organic solutions.

The Heartland Institute has a brief article on the debate at its web site.

Satellites increase crop yields

One way not mentioned in the above suggestions is using satellites to perform what is being called precision farming. William J. Hudson of the Pro Exporter Network wrote a highly informative piece about precision farming in the Nov. 20, 1997 issue of Intellectual Capital. As Hudson describes it,

The first commercialized technology available to farmers along this line is called precision farming, which involves the use of detailed field maps and soil sampling, followed by the application of nutrients by variable rate spreading equipment (sometimes with the aid of GPS systems) — with a goal of putting the exact mix of nutrients next to plants and the soil types, which ill maximize their uptake and leave nothing behind.

This will potentially allow farmers to get higher crop yields while using even less fertilizer. All that’s needed now is more satellites. Several other private companies are working on programs that should have satellites in orbit by 2005 and by 2010 the full extent of their effects should be known according to Hudson.

‘Humanitarian’ Says World Needs China’s One-World Policy

Not content with donating a billion dollars to the United Nations, the Federalist reports Ted Turner recently proposed convening a global conference to consider adopting China’s one-child policy worldwide to slow population growth. For those unaware, in the late 1970s China adopted a policy of limiting families to one child and requiring prospective parents to obtain birth permits to have children.

Largely ignored in rural China, the main effect of the policy has been to encourage the abandonment of large numbers of children, mainly female. In some urban areas where the Chinese government had more control over women, it does seem to have led to forced abortions. Turner, however, insists any one-child policy must be “voluntary.”

Maybe he’s using the Chinese Communist Party’s dictionary!
Ironically while Turner was proposing that the world adopt China’s hideous policy, his wife, Jane Fonda, was speaking out against efforts by the U.S. government to reduce the level of illegitimate births in the United States. Fonda, who is a spokeswoman for “Truth for Youth” which promotes condom use on behalf of condom distributor Durex Consumer Products, was angry that the US government is planning to spend $50 million to promote abstinence prior to marriage.

As Fonda put it, “Most Americans don’t want it. Abstinence until marriage is based on an unreal world that isn’t out there.” Maybe she could get that message across to her husband while she’s at it.

Race to the Bottom

The Population Reference Bureau notes that in 1996 three countries were added to the list of those where total fertility rates were at or below the 1.2 level, bringing to five the number of nations far below their replacement level. The nations and their TFRs are:

Nation TFR
Spain 1.15
Latvia 1.16
Czech Republic 1.18
Bulgaria 1.24
Italy 1.24

(Total fertility rate is the average number of children a woman would have in her lifetime if the birth rate of a particular year remained constant).