Appreciate America Propaganda Posters Series

A series of propaganda posters produced from 1942 to 1945. The “Down Winslow Says” one is especially interesting. Don Winslow of the Navy was an American comic strip that ran from 1934 to 1955. There was Universal serials based on the comic strip released starting in October 1941.

Appreciate America: Remember!
Appreciate America: Stop The Fifth Column
Appreciate America: In Unity There Is Strength
Appreciate America: Report Un-American Activities
Appreciate America: Smash The Bottleneck
Appreciate America: Insurance Policies

Appreciate America: Mickey Mouse
Appreciate America: Donald Duck

“This Man Is Your Friend” World War II Propaganda Posters

The U.S. Office of Facts and Figures created these posters in 1942. They were apparently designed to help soldiers heading abroad to be more familiar with the uniforms of Allied troops.

This Man Is Your Friend – Ethiopian
This Man Is Your Friend – Canadian
This Man Is Your Friend – Australian
This Man Is Your Friend – Chinese
This Man Is Your Friend – Dutch Sailor
This Man Is Your Friend – Englishman

“Knock Off A Japanazi”–World War II Propaganda Poster

This World War II propaganda poster encouraged Americans to buy war savings stamps. These were issued in small denominations that could be collected and exchanged for war bonds. War savings stamps were issued during World War I and World War II. According to Wikipedia,

The war savings stamps introduced during World War II were released in five different denominations – 10 cents, 25 cents, 50 cents, one dollar, and five dollars, all featuring a Minuteman statue. These stamps were purchased at face value and earned no interest. Individuals accumulated their war savings stamps in various collection booklets provided with the purchase of a stamp. Filled collection booklets could later be used to purchase Series E war bonds. For example, a full 25-cent booklet contained 75 stamps and was worth $18.75, which was the initial price of a $25 war bond. Thus, a full 25-cent booklet would be exchanged for a $25 war bond with a time to maturity of ten years.

World War II Propaganda Poster: Avenge December 7

According to its Library of Congress entry, this Avenge December 7 poster was painted by Bernard Perlin and issued by the Office of War Information in 1942. Hard to imagine an image like this ever being used officially as war propaganda today.

 

avenge-december-7-poster