People Are Still Using Crappy Passwords in 2018

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SplashData looked at the passwords of 5 million accounts that were leaked by various breaches in 2018, and found that many users are still using very simple, easy-to-guess passwords.

The top 10 most common passwords, for example, were:

  1. 123456
  2. password 
  3. 123456789
  4. 12345678
  5. 12345
  6. 111111
  7. 1234567 
  8. sunshine
  9. qwerty
  10. iloveyou

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December 25, 2018 @ 21:59:51Current Revision
Title
People Are Still Not Creating Crappy Passwords in 2018  People Are Still Using Crappy Passwords in 2018
Content
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<p>SplashData <a href="https:/ /www.prweb.com/ releases/bad_ password_habits_die_hard_ shows_splashdata_ s_8th_annual_ worst_passwords_ list/prweb15987071.htm">looked at</a> the passwords of 5 million accounts that were leaked by various breaches in 2018, and found that many users are still using very simple, easy-to-guess passwords.</p> <p>SplashData <a href="https:/ /www.prweb.com/ releases/bad_ password_habits_die_hard_ shows_splashdata_ s_8th_annual_ worst_passwords_ list/prweb15987071.htm">looked at</a> the passwords of 5 million accounts that were leaked by various breaches in 2018, and found that many users are still using very simple, easy-to-guess passwords.</p>
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<p>The top 10 most common passwords, for example, were: </p> <p>The top 10 most common passwords, for example, were: </p>
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<ol><li> 123456</li><li> password </li> <li>123456789< /li><li>12345678</li><li> 12345</li><li>111111</li> <li>1234567 < /li><li>sunshine< /li><li>qwerty< /li><li>iloveyou </li></ol>  <ol><li> 123456</li><li> password&nbsp; </li><li>123456789< /li><li>12345678</li><li> 12345</li><li>111111</li> <li>1234567&nbsp;</li><li> sunshine</li> <li>qwerty</ li><li>iloveyou </li></ol>
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  <p>According to SplashData, 2018 is the fifth year in a row that "123456" and "password" were #1 and #2 respectively on their list of common passwords based on analysis of breaches in that year. SplashData offers sensible steps to better create and manage passwords,</p>
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  <blockquote class="wp-block-quote"><p> 1. Use passphrases of twelve characters or more with mixed types of characters.</p><p>2. Use a different password for each of your logins. That way, if a hacker gets access to one of your passwords, they will not be able to use it to access other sites.&nbsp;</p><p>3. Protect your assets and personal identity by using a password manager to organize passwords, generate secure random passwords, and automatically log into websites. </p></blockquote>
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  <p>But, fundamentally, the systems that are in widespread use these days are far too difficult for end users to easily secure.</p>
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